Skip to main content

About your Search

20130216
20130224
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
to reform the economy and government spending soon, the u.s. could find itself in the same terrible economic situation as many european countries do today. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> thank you john for your very kind introduction and the invitation to speak at the heritage foundation today. it's a great privilege to be here. i have always been a great admirer of heritage and the council and in many cases the friendship of many people here at heritage for a very long time i have also admired the way that heritage works across policy areas so that you really do here and integrated message. not least among which i think is the intention of the heritage foundation to the power of culture, by which i mean people believe ideas, habits and expectations in the way that these achieve some form of institutional expression. this issue of culture and how it relates to the economy is at the heart of my book, "becoming europe" because at one level becoming europe is certainly about what has happened in europe and why it is now regarded as the sick man of the global economy. my book is also a
. up next, samuel graveyard use of our elected leaders of find the courage to reform the economy and government spending soon the u.s. could find itself in the same terrible economic situation as many european countries to. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> thank you for your introduction. it's a great privilege to be here. inviting the it council, in many cases the of many people here and heritage for very long time. and also admired the way that heritage works across policy areas so that you really do here and integrated message. not least among which, i think, is the attention of the heritage foundation to the power of culture, by which i mean people of beliefs, ideas, habits, expectations, and the way that these achieve some form of institutional expression. >> on this issue of culture and how it relates to the economy, the heart of my book, becoming europe. because the -- becoming europe is certainly about what has happened to your and why it is now regarded as the sick man of the global economy. but my book is also about how some of these cultural and economic trends
the economies of europe, japan, china, and south korea. next, on booktv. this is a little over an hour.ro ba okay. it is great tock be back at the society. >> for 25 years now, we enjoy a terrific relationship with the a japan society in so manyys wayse ved quudible] bed we have lived quite a bit o time in this is great to be with you let's see, in terms of this whole notion of the book, you know, by the way, it's a very modest title, banker to the world. [laughter] you know, when i heard of this -- and i'm a very close personal friend of bill's, like everybody in this room is, and so when testifies talking to me about this -- when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about, lessons of debt cry cease and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot in what we needed to be able to do. so we were able to convince him, and so now i'm not talking to you as his friend, i'm talking to you as his publisher. [laughter] and we had this decision, you know, we were going to do this book, and we kid. and we did. now, the ink wasn't even dry on this book when
diplomat william rhodes talks about the current economic and financial charges facing the economies of europe, japan, china and south korea. next on booktv. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> okay. first of all, it's great to be back at the japan society, and we enjoy our relationship that way. tokyo, for the mcgraw-hill companies, has been the headquarters of our asia pacific operations for 25 years now, and we enjoy a terrific relationship and a lot concern in a lot of different ways. one of many by colleagues is with me, doug peterson, who just joined us from citi, and he is heading up standard & poor's ratings, and we welcome you, doug. and doug has lived with citi all over the world and as such as lived quite a bit of time in japan itself. so it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see, in terms of this whole notion of the book, you know, by the way, it's a very modest title, banker to the world. [laughter] you know, when i heard of this -- and i'm a very close personal friend of bill's, like everybody in this room is, and so when testifies talking to m
leader but brazil is one of the most important emerging economies for the whole global economy it's one of as we call them the bricks the emerging economies that has the chance to structure how the economy is going to look going forward. when you think about the countries but obviously the united states when you think about the countries along the pacific rim of latin america they make connect more to the economy of asia. i was always struck when i would go to something called the summit of the americas which is about latin america and the caribbean and we would have these discussions and travis would take off and everybody would sort of what ever. but then almost a week or two weeks later we would go to the asia pacific economic council. there it is the pacific rim countries of chellie and the pacific rim all the way to canada and all the way out through japan and china and korea and the conversation was completely different. was about global trade and freeing trade. and i actually always thought that in that sense the country had more in common with their asian counterparts than their
. as millions of people try to learn how to do something new productive in the global economy, which is one reason it's so difficult to deal with unemployment. if you drive a construction wages commute traffic manufacturing wages, which we did with this instruction become a matter of millions of manufacturing jobs overseas to places like india and china. initially the people did know how to do that work for a while. for having a really difficult time getting those jobs that. how did we make a mistake of that magnitude? that is a really big error. they never make a mistake of that magnitude. he takes government policy to create that mistaken in this case it through the culprits are the federal reserves, fdic in government housing policy. in a fundamental context, the real cause our errors made by the federal reserve cut a something many people know but don't get what it means. in 1813 the federal reserve is created, the monetary system is nationalized. there is no private monetary system. if you're having problems in the monetary system, with this financial crisis is about, by definition the
't just that he focused on the laser beam of the economy. the economy was nowhere near as bad as the one barack obama inherited. he was doing so many things at once. he accomplished an incredible amount of stuff. but one result of that was it was very hard for the american electorate to see all of these things popping up. like with good health care reform have to do with getting people back to work. the answer is not anything really. it was a good thing to do in its own right. and so you have people watching this burst of activity and not really perceiving the job that the obama administration presented as a much worse things that we could've had. if i have talked to already, i thank you. let me stop there and see what other questions we have. matt. [inaudible conversations] >> thank you. >> we will take some questions. >> this is a bit of a town meeting. if you are comfortable saying your name, please do. please line up at the microphone and please ask a brief question as opposed to a long speech. >> my question is people were blamed for lack of personal responsibility, but the banks a
, patriotic smugglers during the colonial war during this time in this country there are existing economies between good and bad. it was alluded to a moment ago by pat in her comments a moment ago. it feigns dynamism. it reminds you that what is forgotten now may not always be so. the impermanence of what is forgotten. it is an antidote to naturalizing things. how things are, how they will be, and how they should be. how the book challenges us, well, we have many episodes of demonization and also what we might call dehumanization or purification. these are very telling because it sheds a light on who gets to define what is permitted and what is not. based on the power to define what is legal and what is not. in the book it talks about before the revolution and in the late 19th and early 20th century, we saw the purity crusader, his name was anthony. he was responsible for being against illicit images and condoms being illegal. this is all forms of contraception including commons are legal. including the issuance of condoms for u.s. soldiers and etc. i will deconstruct the incompletion voyeu
economy? it was tobacco. these were all drugs. and the first time a lot of these drugs were introduced back to europe, um, people looked at them with revulsion, right? tobacco, it was a bizarre thing. why would you put fire and smoke into your mouth? coffee was thought to be a subversive thing, it was a death penalty offense in many states. for good reason, people would go to t.a.r.p.es, and the only -- taverns, and the only safe thing to drink was alcohol, but with coffee you had to boil the water which made it safe, but it also stimulated people. coffeehouses became revolutionary hotbeds. people started talking politics instead of just getting drunk every night. [laughter] so it was, you know, initially a death penalty offense in many states, and now we have turkish coffee, english tea time and, of course, the tobacco fortunes that drove a lot of u.s. and european development. and so long story short, the reason half the world got colonized in some ways is because of a bunch of old white men in europe couldn't get it up. so there you have sex, drugs and international relations in a n
in that regard and explaining how, in fact, health care is much like other sectors of the economy. david quillen up in new york outside of new york city and nassau county. his father was a psychiatrist. he went to harvard college and then got a masters at nyu. he then became an investment banker doing mortgage finance at morgan stanley lehman brothers where he had a front row seat to fannie and freddie, which is something we might hear more from him in the q&a. and he got involved in television and he is ceo of the game show network and came to policy writing relate in his life because of this tragedy that affected his life. eroded cover story in the atlantic magazine. and then turned that into a book, and it's an incredibly compelling book, which i encourage all of you to buy. there's copies outside the animals were instructed to say that the next season of the american bible challenge, the game show network highest rated show, is coming on in a few weeks. said the game show network and feel like we are not stealing its ceo from his ceo duties, and we're giving them a plug, too. so please join
these economies to diversify and wean them off coca eventually. it's counterintuitive but it's like the recession in the united states. as long as people are insecure and don't know what tomorrow is going to bring, they're going to hunker down and not take risks and invest and die veers file the economy. >> i want to congratulate or two speakers. i'm one who considers myself somebody who follows this issue closely and i have some insights i learn and i congratulate you for your very provac staff and effective presentations. i want to make two points in addition to that. that is, bolivia -- you mentioned the embassy. i suppose that by the americans, if they consumed coca to adjust to the altitude. other nonindigenous sectors in bow livearch student groups or truck drivers or taxi drivers who are big consumers of coca for a functional reason. you chew coca and lots of it more than a couple cups of coffee to study for an exam. truck drivers to stay alert on the road. so you have a lot of nice contributions to society from using coca from the middle class sectors as well. it struck me, too that pursu
a hundred years in a healthy book economy to get around to something as novel as an enhanced e-book, and now they are doing it. i don't know how it will work. tomorrow, in baltimore, i'm teaching a seminar built around the short book. i taught it before at other schools, at chapel hill last spring communitying from baltimore. this time it's different in two respects. it's built around the shorter books with readings from the other books too with a seminar in front of me, and i'll have people online from all over the country, and even outside the country around the world auditing this class in the check for whether or not we can use the same technology that will create an enhanced e-book, but use that technology to invite large numbers of of students -- numbers of students to use the web. there's a lot of newfangled items going on about how this is presented that i am struggling to catch up with myself. i now -- they instructed me how to tweet and twitter and facebook and all the other things, but like the enhanced e-book, i can't do because i don't have an ipad, but i believe in the possibil
't pay attention to the fact the economy blows. economy is horrible. everybody knows the economy is horrible and the economy has not begun to recover any time since the let's talk about condos, let's talk about essentially how the left ran the campaign. we can not be sidetracked by that. we are always playing defense because you're a bad person and natural human instinct is someone says you are a bad person the natural human instinct is to say no i am not. i am not a bad person. why are you saying that? i am not a racist. how can you call me -- no evidence for that. the first instinct needs to be go on the offensive. they are the real racists for defacing the term racism to apply for things that clearly and definitely not racist. if you call something a basic economic policy anti-semitic, had nothing to do with jews, that is an anti-semitic move because your watering down anti-semitism to apply to thing that did not apply. when they're calling people racist without any basis is like a boy who cried wolf. what they're doing is making room for real raise this to be one into the cat
to be a great and optimistic sense and serious prh an economy that has been stripped of its industrial base and facing international competition. we have environmental problems, just as problems, all of these things in the bond that we can create. that is the essence of patriotism they were figuring out ways to set in motion these freedoms that strengthen everyone and increase the economy and the ties that bind and a convert to be able to sit here tonight. we need to be able to do it again, and in order to do that, we have to have a better sense. because our history is not just about where we sat in the steel. our history is about our future and what tools we will use to build strength across the alliance. it is not often that we misremember these relations that are involved. i think we should be ashamed of doing it on the left and right. a lot in the civil rights movement turned against their own example. that includes people in the civil rights movement, the most powerful idea was the first one that was abandoned. there were a lot of other religions as well. the law turned against religio
by one. number one, chapter one. earth inc, a new interconnected, global economy that operates as if it is a single entity. we've been seeing the outsourcing of jobs, and we've been seeing the connection of the supply side, and now we have virtual factories with supply lines running to hundreds of countries and almost every business has to see its competitive landscape in the global dimension. earth inc.has a different relationship to national government and national economic policies now, a different relationship to labor and capital and natural resources, the three classic factors of production. look, for example, one of the changes that illustrates this new really of effort inc. , and normally after a recession when we get a recovery and growth resumes, the jobs come back, and that's the way it's always been, but in the last couple of recessions, it had not happened that way because we now have this gloanl reality, and -- global reality, and some businesses that lay people off in the recession, they are not hiring them back the way they used to. some of them, yes, but we now
theory where the assumption is that if you reduce tax cuts it will stimulate the economy so much that it will actually come close to, if not actually increase federal revenue. but when we heard that it made no sense. now, here is where it really gets, i think, in some ways, even worse. i have to say, mitch mcconnell does provide me with a lot of material. [laughter] in 2010 the two big tax cuts were all won in 03. in 2010 at a time when, you know, it was pretty clear that that first decade would yield the revenue reductions on the scales somewhere between two and $3 trillion over the first ten years, mitch mcconnell, july 2010, he confirmed the next day that what senator john kyl had set a few days earlier was accurate. he said, there is no evidence whatsoever that the bush tax cuts actually diminish revenue. the increased revenue because of the vibrancy of the tax cuts and the economy. i think what the senator was expressing was the view of virtually every republican on that subject. and i was, this is no kind word that you can say in response to that. they're making this up. th
the economy so much that it will actually come close to, if not actually increase, federal revenues. but when we heard that, it made no sense. now, here's where it really gets -- i think in some ways even worse. i'm going to find -- i have to say, mitch mcconnell does provide me with a lot of material. [laughter] >> in 2010, the two big tax cuts were '01 and '03. in 2010, mitch -- at a time when it was pretty clear that the first decade would yield revenue reductions on the scale of somewhere between 2 and $3 trillion over the first ten years. mitch mcconnell said to the press, july 2010, he confirmed the next day that what john -- senator john kyl said a few days earlier was accurate. mcconnell said there's no evidence whatsoever that the bush tax cuts actually dim minimum issued revenue. they increased revenue because of the vibe bran si of the tax cuts and the economy. so i think what senator kyl was expressing was the view of virtually every republican on that subject. and i would say, as they say here, this is no kind word for -- you can say in response to this. they're making this up. t
economies of black communities, the northern ghetto, so to speak should be run by blacks instead of absentee white owners. he believes community control of schools. so yes, he believes in black autonomy. he's not an integrationist as such and he said it's up to us, it is our struggle. >> taylor branch, author of the multivolume, "america in the king years" presents his thoughts on key moments in the civil rights movement. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> thank you, mr. hill. i've been here before. i'm glad to be back and now glad to be back talking about something that has been a subject dear to me for my whole life and is inescapable now that i'm getting older, that it is my life's work and i am glad for it. this is another round. i'm going to take more questions tonight. going to say provocative things about what i think this history is significant and about this project itself, which is a little odd to spend 24 years writing a 2300 page trilogy and commodity years later with 190 page book. a lot of people who have read some of the other ones think it's probably not true, that i'm
years. view did not grow the government or the economy at all, a white reporter self in that position? so the federal reserve has increased the balance sheet trading to a trillion dollars of funny money and ultimately the pain of that will fall on the middle-class and the very pork but it will defeat of both parties said they want yet we don't have the courage to day to make the tough tauruses even if we lose our seat to secure the future we put ourselves first visit of the country and the american citizen if they read the black-and-white there common-sense ways to save money. just this week the air force announced we will spend 64 to million dollars of 90 projects. the gao says the least half of that will be wasted. it will never get completed or do what it is supposed to do. back-to-back we had a program cancelled as. because it will never work. this is out inefficient government was they finally cancel that we spend another $100 million, they paid a settlement be to cancel a vaguely dollars the the person responsible did not get fired and not held accountable and the company that d
of a real economy. and they're one of the things most misunderstood in health care, and it's a little wonky, but these things actually drive the way human beings receive service. one of the things we assume is that -- the question is how do we pay for health care? one of the arguments i'm making today is the how we pay drives the type of care we're getting. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> here are some of the latest head ryanlines -- headlines surrounding the publishing industry the past week. a class action lawsuit has been filed against amazon and six other publishers, simon & schuster, random house, penguin, mcmillan and harpercollins. the booksellers filing the suit, fiction addiction of greenville, south carolina, bookhouse in albany, new york, and pozen books in the new york city, all claim that amazon and the major publishers have formed confidential agreements to monopolize print and e-book sales. the the suit will concentrate on digital rights management with independent bookstores urging the court to prohibit amazon from selling e-books that are l
as the economy was recovering? all the way back to the french and indian war. a very young george washington was writing very romantic letters to a woman who was not mrs. washington. her name was sally fairfax, a very attractive, older, sophisticated neighbor. what if washington's letters had become public during the french and indian war or the revolutionary war? much as petraeus' e-mails became public? and what if we got rid of george washington? so bill clinton's not the first and not the worst. petraeus is not the first and not the worst. been there, done that, there's a long history of it. in fact, it pains me to say that even abraham lincoln -- [laughter] visited a prostitute. i know. say it isn't so, right? but it happened. now, the details on it are sketchy. there's not a lot of letters written about this. but here's what we can piece together. lincoln's best friend was joshua speed, and speed was perhaps as dashing and as happened handsome and as, quote-unquote, lucky with the ladies as lincoln was allegedly homely and awkward and unlucky in romance. and speed felt sorry for lincoln
. for the benefit of the economy. >> host: what is the science behind the 4-g? >> guest: i'm not sure i could answer that in layman's terms. i should probably get some engineering personnel there. it is something called ofdm that makes a much more use of efficiency. i'm sure they could tell you how it works. >> host: verizon, what is the current status between verizon and the others? >> guest: the second portion of that deal closed last summer. we are expecting it sometime this year, that it will be, you know, this year maybe next year -- we will be watching for it. [talking over each other] >> host: will it be online? >> guest: yes, it will be. we purchase that kirk -- per capacity. it is more and more of a crunch and we can see it online and serve the needs of our customers. >> host: you sent out a tweet about how verizon could use the spectrum more efficiently. did you get some feedback, with some of it negative and what is your response? >> guest: well, it has been interesting. you have to take everything with a little bit of a grain of salt. what happened is t-mobile, we actually sold some spec
but nonetheless they now believe their economies believe, they would have to close down to be a private prison company is now with the new york stock exchange and doing quite well even in a time of economic recession those companies would be forced into bankruptcy. this system of mass incarceration is so deeply rooted in our social, political and economic structure that it's not just going to fade away or downsized out of sight. we have a major upheaval, a fairly radical shift in our public consciousness. i know there's many people today that would say there is no hope of ending mass incarceration in america. no, there is no hope, pick another issue. just as many people were designed to jim crow in the south and would say yes that's a shame, it's a shame but that's just the way it is i find so many people today view of the millions sidling in and out of the prisons and jails today it's unfortunate but a fact of american life. i'm quite certain that dr. king wouldn't have been so resigned. so i believe that if we are truly to honor dr. king, if we are ever to catch up with him, we have to conti
. to the benefit of the economy. >> host: what's the science behind the 4g being more efficient or better -- >> guest: oh, jeez. >> host: can you -- >> guest: i'm not sure doing. >> host: in a layman's way -- >> guest: i'm not sure in a layman's way you could answer that question. i should probably get some of our engineering personnel there. it's something called ofdm that just makes, you know, a much more efficient use of the frequencies. so there are plenty of people, you could go talk to qualcomm on the floor, and i'm sure they could tell you how it works. sorry. [laughter] >> host: okay. charla rath, what's the current status of the deal between verizon and the cable companies for verizon to buy some of their spectrum? >> guest: well, that, actually, that deal -- the spectrum portion of that deal closed last summer. we bought nearly nationwide spectrum from spectrum co. for close to $4 billion. it's about 20 megahertz nationwide. and that, actually, closed and, you know, we're expecting that sometime i think probably sometime this year we'll be, you know, this year, maybe early next
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)